Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/62
Title: Rapid reduction and complexation of vanadium by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-toluoyl-5-pyrazolone: Spectorscopic characterization and structure modelling
Authors: Remya, P N
Suresh, C H
Reddy, M L P
Keywords: Oxovanadium (IV) complex
4-Acyl-5-pyrazolone
Redox chemistry
Spectroscopic characterization
DFT Calculations
Issue Date: 30-Oct-2007
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Polyhedron 26(17):5016-5022;30 Oct 2007
Abstract: The reduction of oxovanadium (V) by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-toluoyl-5-pyrazolone (Hpmtp) over the pH range 1.0-7.0 has been assessed by cyclic voltammetry, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, FT-IR, electronic spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectroscopy and elemental analyses. The reaction proceeds by the transfer of one electron from Hpmtp to oxovanadium (V) via the formation of a free-radical intermediate, and subsequently the reduced oxovanadium (IV) species rapidly complexes with the available free ligand. An indirect evidence for the generation of the free-radical intermediate in the process of the reduction has been confirmed by acrylonitrile polymerization. The free-radical intermediates thus generated in the process couple to form a dimer, which also has been confirmed by various spectroscopic techniques. The electronic spectrum of VO(pmtp)2 displays characteristic absorption peaks corresponding to transitions from the dxy orbital to dxz (794nm), dyz (643 nm), dx2-y2 (501 nm) and dZ2 (424 nm) of the oxovanadium (IV) complex with a distorted square pyramidal geometry. The slightly distorted square pyramidal geometry was obtained from a DFT calculation with the four oxygen atoms from the two pmtp- ligands at the base and a VO double bond of length 1.584 A pointing towards the aped of the pyramid.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/62
Appears in Collections:2007

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